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Apostle Islands Historic Preservation Conservancy

Established in 2006, the AIHPC is a community-based nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of the many historic properties and cultural landscapes in the Apostle Islands region on northern Wisconsin.  Beginning with a core group of families who hold longstanding property interests in historically-significant buildings on Sand and Rocky Islands, in some cases dating from the late 1800′s, the Conservancy represents a wide range of interests throughout the Chequamegon Peninsula.

 

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Today in Chequamegon history: an ironic pairing.

Outer Island Light Station keeper's log, September 24, 1874: "We left in our sail boat for Bayfield to get provisions. Arrived that night about 12 o’clock. I went over to LaPointe the next morning to get pork and hams as there was none in Bayfield. I got some there. It rained from Friday night till Sunday with heavy wind. Sunday night we left at ½ past 3 o’clock PM with fair wind, but soon died out with baffling winds, but finally set in with fair wind, so that we carried clost reef foresail and mainsail with all we wanted at that. Arrived at Outer Light about ½ past one PM. They was anxiously looking as they were about out of grub. Washing away again the dock, and also the RR track leading from the bank to the lake by the rains. "

Brief interruption: holy smokes! But that's Outer Island for you. Okay, back to our regularly scheduled logbook entry:

"I brot with me some currant bushes and raspberries. I set them out near the house."

Now, let's head to Michigan Island and fast-forward sixty-one years. Michigan Island Light Station keeper's log, September 24, 1935: "Did routine work. Skilled Laborer, Fred Wacksmith, left for Bayfield. Gonia brothers landed here with seven men looking over white pine and for parasites caused by Currant and Gooseberry bushes."

Catch that?

"I brot with me some currant bushes and raspberries."

"...looking over white pine and for parasites caused by Currant and Gooseberry bushes."

Oooops! Exotic species... they're still an issue today.

Photo: Black currant (Ribes sativum), University of Minnesota photo.

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Collected and edited by Bob Mackreth for the Apostle Islands Historic Preservation Conservancy, a community-based nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of the historic heritage of the Apostle Islands region of northern Wisconsin.

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